The Best Industrial Pavers in the Midwest 630.963.7800
The Best Industrial Pavers in the Midwest

Go Green

Briggs Paving practiced green before green was cool.

At Briggs Paving, we use environmentally friendly practices in many different ways. From using eco-friendly sealers to recycling broken concrete and asphalt for reuse (for example, as base material or even in our newly placed pavement), Briggs Paving is the leading sustainable paving company in the Chicagoland area. Some of the green practices used by Briggs Paving are listed below:

RAP (Reclaimed Asphalt Product)

Reclaimed Asphalt Product, or RAP, is existing asphalt pavement that has been processed or recycled for use in hot mix asphalt or aggregate base courses.

The use of RAP in hot mix asphalt is a growing trend that Briggs Paving has been utilizing for years. Traditional asphalt is composed of a mixture stone and sand, and it is bound together by asphalt cement (a product of crude oil). Hot mix asphalt with RAP reduces the amount of stone (a natural resource in limited supply) that needs to be mined. Furthermore, asphalt with RAP reduces the amount of asphalt cement that would be used in asphalt production because it already exists in RAP.

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Thousands of tons of RAP (Reclaimed Asphalt Product) were taken from local projects and recycled to form the base course on nearly two acres of parking lot and roadway at Marmion Academy in Aurora.

Asphalt Based Emulsion

Traditional sealcoats involve using a coal tar based emulsion. Coal tar is a volatile product harmful to humans and wildlife. Coal tar has been linked to cancer and causes painful chemical burns to the skin when one comes in contact with it. Storm water runoff from coal tar sealed surfaces contaminates streams and ponds killing the fish and wildlife that live in them.

In 2002, Briggs Paving eliminated the use of coal tar emulsion as its standard mix design and adopted the new greener asphalt based emulsion. Asphalt based emulsion won’t harm wildlife and is better for the environment. Unfortunately, the pavement industry has been unwilling to change its practice of using coal tar because it is easy to work with and is readily available. Contact a Briggs Paving representative to discuss the many advantages of asphalt based seal coat products.

Crushed Concrete Full/Partial Depth Reclamation

Full Depth Reclamation (FDR) is the process of pulverizing the existing pavement section in place. The freshly pulverized asphalt pavement is usually treated with foam asphalt, cement, or lime to create the desired structural value of the pavement. The reclaimed pavement is then graded and compacted to achieve a solid base, which is then paved over giving a new pavement surface. The main benefit of full depth reclamation is that 100 percent of the existing pavement is recycled; thus eliminating the need for dumping in landfills.

Partial Depth Reclamation is virtually the same process. The difference is that the asphalt surface is removed and can be reused in the new asphalt pavement. This process may be used where elevation requirements may not permit the use of full depth reclamation.

Environmentally Friendly Equipment

Briggs Paving prides itself on being on the cutting edge of paving technology. As the industry continues to advance, there is a need for new paving equipment. The EPA has enacted new emissions standards on off road and on road construction equipment. State and local governmental agencies also recognize the need to reduce emissions and are requiring construction equipment to comply with the new EPA regulations. Briggs Paving uses paving equipment that is at the forefront of the paving industry. Our equipment does not just meet the technological requirements, but it almost always exceeds the new, more stringent emissions standards.

 

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